Home Grown Mead

Ever since we harvested the first batch of honey in August, I’ve had three pounds of the stuff in my kitchen cupboard.

But no more!

Kim and I finally got into gear and started fermenting it into honey. And Omar, my cat, started modelling it.

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We set the honey jar in a warm bath for a few minutes to get it flowing. Even warmed up, it didn’t exactly rush through the funnel.

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This gave us plenty of time for photo ops.

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I’d put a few inches of water in the bottom of the jug to begin with, hoping that it would keep the honey from sticking to the bottom. Honey, it turns out, is a lot denser than water. It sank straight to the bottom. Maybe a couple¬†hardy water molecules stuck to the bottom…

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Before the jug was completely full, I gave it a good shake. I missed getting to do this when I did the five gallon batch. This process both mixes the honey and water together and aerates the must.

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I got really into it.

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And I may have aerated too vigorously.

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With all those bubbles, the primed yeast and nutrient didn’t have much space. I’m having bad flashbacks to my raspberry melomel…

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Despite some cramped quarters, the mead is a beautiful color. I’ll have to keep an eye on it to make sure it doesn’t blow its lid.

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One thought on “Home Grown Mead

  1. Pingback: Uncle Beth’s Home Grown Mead | Liz Baessler

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